Philosophical Musings

April 16, 2007

Major Lables are not to blame for Music Business Demise

Filed under: business,Copyrights,economy,music — Elad Kehat @ 7:26 pm

A NY Times article by Tony Sachs and Sal Nunziato tells the story of the independent CD shop that they owned in Manhattan for 12 years, until it closed in 2005.
They are full of criticism for the major record labels, whom they blame for making all the wrong moves in the face of the file sharing revolution, mistakes that they claim have led to their shop going out of business.
It is an important read, that helps you realize how the revolution does not hurt just big faceless corporations or multimillionaire-but-still-gready musicians. It also affects small business owners, who lose the business that they had spent 12 years nurturing.
But as much as I share their loathing for the big record labels, Mssrs Sachs and Nunziato are plain wrong. The labels are not responsible for the demise of their shop, and rather than make mistakes, I believe that they soon enough realized where all this is going, and began fighting for their lives with all the tools at their discretion (basicly money, which is used to influence lawmakers and public opinion).
Sachs and Nunziato’s shop had closed because its many of its customers no longer had a need for it. It’s great that their staff, unlike Best Buy’s actually “knew who Van Morrison was”, but people now go to the internet for music advice. It’s fun to claim that Tower Records had “the entire history of recorded music under one roof”, but that claim is plain wrong, and in any case, we can turn to file sharing to really find any piece of music ever recorded, and searching for it is easier too.
They continue by claiming that “the customers who had grudgingly come to trust our opinions made the move to online shopping or lost interest in buying music altogether. Some of the most loyal fans had been soured into denying themselves the music they loved.” Come on guys, people don’t deny themselves of the music they love. Instead they have a much better source now, and they still spend endless hours browsing and building themselves a great collection, but it doesn’t cost them money.
They end by saying that “the occupation we planned on spending our working lives at is rapidly becoming obsolete. And that loss hits us hard — not just as music retailers, but as music fans.” Again, while it’s heart wrenching that someone’s life creation is becoming obsolete, you can’t stop technology. Too bad that you share your lot with the buggy drivers, but that’s life. You can’t blame the major record labels for this. Change is an inevitable part of our world, better learn how to handle it. Finally, we should also keep in mind that recorded music, the basis for the CD shop business (the entire music business actually), was enabled by a technological advance. Some times these advances are good for you, some times they’re not.
Finally, as self-described “music fans”, these guys should be happy with the change. What it really means is more music in the hands of more people. Business has nothing to do with it.

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1 Comment »

  1. You really have no clue what you’re talking about re: the music business or retail ! mThe music business screwed everything up over 10 years ago and will be dead ( as we know it now )within 5/10 years.

    Comment by John Kioussis — June 24, 2007 @ 5:42 am | Reply


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